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Teoria del Writing
di Alessandro Ferri a.k.a. Dado

Data-driven cities? Digital urbanism and its proxies

Track at | 4S/EASST joint conference
“Science and technology by other means: Exploring collectives, spaces and futures”
Barcelona, 31 August – 3 September 2016

Convenors

Claudio Coletta (Maynooth University) email
Laurie Waller (Technische Universität München) email
Liam Heaphy (Maynooth University) email
Sung-Yueh Perng (Lancaster University) email
Mail All Convenors

Short Abstract

The track explores the digital, data-driven and networked making of urban environment. We welcome contributions in various formats: presentations, audio, video and photographic accounts, as well as performances and live demonstrations of public interfaces and software tools for urban analysis.

Long Abstract

How do software and space work in urban everyday life and urban management? How do data and policies actually shape each other? What forms of delegation, enrollment and appropriation take place?

Contemporary urban environments are characterised by dense arrangements of data, algorithms, mobile device, networked infrastructures. Multiple technologies (such as smart metering, sensing networks, GPS, CCTV, induction loops, mobile apps) are connected with multiple processes (such as institutional data management, data brokering, crowdsourcing, workflow management), aiming to provide sustainable, efficient, integrated city governance and services.

Within this context, vested interests interact in a multi-billion global market where corporations, companies and start-ups propose data-driven urban solutions, while public administrations increasingly delegate control over citizens’ data. Also, public institutions and private companies leverage the efforts of open data movements, engaged civic communities and citizen-minded initiatives to find new ways to create public and economic value from urban data.

However, the making of digital and data-driven urbanism is uncertain, fragile, contested, conflicting.

The track intends to stimulate the debate on: the different forms of performing and making sense of the urban environment through data and algorithms; the different ways to approach the relationship between data, software and cities.

We welcome theoretical and empirical contributions critically addressing the following (non-exhaustive-list-of) topics:

– urban big data, dashboards, data analytics and brokering;

– IoT based urban services and governance;

– civic hacking, open data movements;

– privacy, security and surveillance in data-driven cities;

– crowd, mobility and traffic management;

– sensors, monitoring, mapping and modelling for urban facilities;

– digitization of built environment.

+ info | http://www.nomadit.co.uk/easst/easst_4s2016/panels.php5?PanelID=3898

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